Category Archives: Muay Thai

Brand New Muay Thai class

I am excited to announce I am teaching a brand new Muay Thai class on a Thursday nights at 830 pm at the Woodside Boxing Academy located at 41-25 58th St.
Woodside, NY, 11377.
We will be training on Thursday nights at 830 pm.

The class is for all ages and levels.
If you are in New York, stop by and give it a try!

Discipline And Martial Arts

Discipline is doing what needs to be DONE, even when you don’t want to do it.

Through the years, martial  arts has taught me discipline both inside the gym and through the other areas of my life.

Has martial arts contributed to your life in a positive way?

Do you have an interesting story that tell?

If so, we would be love to share it.  Either comment below, send us a message on social media or send an email to info@fightingiseasy.com.

Can’t wait to hear from you!

Happy Friday!

Technique of the Month_Elbows

Muay Thai is known as the “Art of 8 Limbs”.
It is known as the “Art of 8 Limbs” because we use our 8 limbs (i.e. arms , legs, knees and Elbows) as weapons to attack our opponent.
Today, I will break down the Muay Thai slashing elbow or “Sok ti” in the Thai language.
The slashing elbow is a short range weapon.
By short range, I mean we have to be close to our opponent to utilize it.
For a better picture think:
Using an axe (short range).
vs
Swinging a baseball bat (long range).
Throwing elbows can be dangerous and maybe for good reason.
Elbows are meant to draw blood or strike precisely to cause instantaneous knockouts!
In a professional Muay Thai fight, elbows can end a fight in an instant. That is what makes them so exciting.
Quick note:
In practice, we do not spar with elbows until after years of practice. Once a student is considered “advanced”, elbows can be used in practice. Even then, we usually use elbow pads for protection.
So, back to the slashing elbow.
The slashing elbow is executed quickly and efficiently.
While being on the receiving end may not be all smiles, throwing them can be fun.
You can ask any of my students that have done padwork with me.
Here is the breakdown of the the video shown above.
1. I make sure I am at the right distance to throw the elbow.
2. I bring my elbow up by my ear.
3. I chop it down to the pad and bring my hand back to my head.
There you have it.
That is all I have for now on the Muay Thai elbow.

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5 Tips for a Healthy Lifestyle

Hey, quick reminder my “Knockout Nutrition Plan” is available in my online store.

Do you remember those New Year’s Resolutions you made earlier this year?

Hopefully you are still on track. It is understandable if you slip up with Thanksgiving, Christmas, and now Valentine’s Day.  Those New Year’s resolutions seem to decrease in priority.

Unhealthy meals and candy might be winning out over the healthy foods you committed to earlier this year.

But, don’t give up!

I have put together 5 Healthy tips  to keep you motivated and headed towards your goals.  Enjoy!

  1.  Drink plenty of water!
    • Water will not only keep you hydrated, which is good for the body in general. It makes you feel full throughout the day.
  2. Get 6-8 hours of sleep.
    •  Sleep keeps your mind and body working as efficiently as possible. It helps with metabolism and helps heal your body.
  3.   Prep your meals and eat small meals throughout the day.
    • Eating (lots of) small meals boosts your metabolism and leaves you feeling satisfied rather than stuffed.
  4. Get 30 minutes of exercise per day.
    • Even 30 minutes of physical activity per day will help with weight-loss and boost your energy levels.
  5. Try smoothies for a snack or pre-workout boost!
    – This is for that quick energy boost before a workout.

If you need some help getting going, don’t forget Nutrition packages are available at my Online Store.

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That’s it for now. Remember to keep fighting for what you believe in.

Technique of the Month Muay Thai Jab

It is with great pleasure to present you with the first technique breakdown in our “Technique of the Month” series.

I will share as much of my martial arts knowledge as I can without straying off topic, as I can go on and on for days about this subject.

This will give some insight into the technical aspect of martial arts to the uninformed, beginner or advanced martial artist.
I am sure that the advanced martial artist will appreciate the technical breakdown of the techniques.

So, let’s begin, shall we.

The first technique we will cover will be the Muay Thai Jab.

There are several types of jabs in boxing, Muay Thai and other forms of martial arts.

For example, in boxing, these can include the “basic jab”, the “step jab”, the “power jab”, the “counter jab” the “up jab” along with several others. These jabs can be used for offense and defense.

In Muay Thai, we focus on a long range jab. This is the technique we will cover today.

Now, the Muay Thai jab, in itself, is a very simple, but effective weapon. The motion itself is literally straightforward. Take a look at the video clip of me demonstrating the jab.

The fist travels in a linear fashion from my temple to a fully extended position and return It to the start position. There are some other subtleties, but that is it really.

The difference between the basic jab and the Muay Thai jab is the slight extension at the shoulder. This extension allows the jab to travel farther than the normal length of my arm.

The Muay Thai jab can be quite deceptive and I often catch people off guard in sparring and it has helped in some of my fights.

In a Pro boxing match, you will often hear the commentator mention that the boxer with the better jab will end up winning the fight. And it is usually true. But, let’s get back on topic

Another reason this jab is utilized by Muay Thai practitioners is that keeps heavy punchers at bay, so to speak.

Let’s say I am fighting a person that throws big punches in “bunches”. I can utilize one or two quick jabs to create distance or snap their head back and throw off their rhythm.

The Muay Thai jab also allows you to keep enough distance between you and your opponent to throw those heavy kicks that are so effective in Muay Thai.

In Muay Thai fights, big kicks mean big points on the scorecards. Plus, no one likes getting kicked. Lol.

That is all I have for now on the Muay Thai Jab. If you are interested in learning more about my programs, please check out my Website.

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That’s it for now. Remember to keep fighting for what you believe in.