Tag Archives: sports

Client Motivation Monday

Pic with my client, Sam, in front of Golds gym. He was on #vacation this past Sunday, but no rest for him.  👍🏽💪🏽💪🏽

Sam has also lost 9 pounds so far,  gained muscle mass, and increased at least 20 pounds in most of his weights.

He has also learned about a year’s worth of Muay Thai in a few months.

I am very proud to be on his fitness journey.

Technique of the Month_Elbows

Muay Thai is known as the “Art of 8 Limbs”.
It is known as the “Art of 8 Limbs” because we use our 8 limbs (i.e. arms , legs, knees and Elbows) as weapons to attack our opponent.
Today, I will break down the Muay Thai slashing elbow or “Sok ti” in the Thai language.
The slashing elbow is a short range weapon.
By short range, I mean we have to be close to our opponent to utilize it.
For a better picture think:
Using an axe (short range).
vs
Swinging a baseball bat (long range).
Throwing elbows can be dangerous and maybe for good reason.
Elbows are meant to draw blood or strike precisely to cause instantaneous knockouts!
In a professional Muay Thai fight, elbows can end a fight in an instant. That is what makes them so exciting.
Quick note:
In practice, we do not spar with elbows until after years of practice. Once a student is considered “advanced”, elbows can be used in practice. Even then, we usually use elbow pads for protection.
So, back to the slashing elbow.
The slashing elbow is executed quickly and efficiently.
While being on the receiving end may not be all smiles, throwing them can be fun.
You can ask any of my students that have done padwork with me.
Here is the breakdown of the the video shown above.
1. I make sure I am at the right distance to throw the elbow.
2. I bring my elbow up by my ear.
3. I chop it down to the pad and bring my hand back to my head.
There you have it.
That is all I have for now on the Muay Thai elbow.

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5 Tips for a Healthy Lifestyle

Hey, quick reminder my “Knockout Nutrition Plan” is available in my online store.

Do you remember those New Year’s Resolutions you made earlier this year?

Hopefully you are still on track. It is understandable if you slip up with Thanksgiving, Christmas, and now Valentine’s Day.  Those New Year’s resolutions seem to decrease in priority.

Unhealthy meals and candy might be winning out over the healthy foods you committed to earlier this year.

But, don’t give up!

I have put together 5 Healthy tips  to keep you motivated and headed towards your goals.  Enjoy!

  1.  Drink plenty of water!
    • Water will not only keep you hydrated, which is good for the body in general. It makes you feel full throughout the day.
  2. Get 6-8 hours of sleep.
    •  Sleep keeps your mind and body working as efficiently as possible. It helps with metabolism and helps heal your body.
  3.   Prep your meals and eat small meals throughout the day.
    • Eating (lots of) small meals boosts your metabolism and leaves you feeling satisfied rather than stuffed.
  4. Get 30 minutes of exercise per day.
    • Even 30 minutes of physical activity per day will help with weight-loss and boost your energy levels.
  5. Try smoothies for a snack or pre-workout boost!
    – This is for that quick energy boost before a workout.

If you need some help getting going, don’t forget Nutrition packages are available at my Online Store.

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That’s it for now. Remember to keep fighting for what you believe in.

Technique of the Month Muay Thai Jab

It is with great pleasure to present you with the first technique breakdown in our “Technique of the Month” series.

I will share as much of my martial arts knowledge as I can without straying off topic, as I can go on and on for days about this subject.

This will give some insight into the technical aspect of martial arts to the uninformed, beginner or advanced martial artist.
I am sure that the advanced martial artist will appreciate the technical breakdown of the techniques.

So, let’s begin, shall we.

The first technique we will cover will be the Muay Thai Jab.

There are several types of jabs in boxing, Muay Thai and other forms of martial arts.

For example, in boxing, these can include the “basic jab”, the “step jab”, the “power jab”, the “counter jab” the “up jab” along with several others. These jabs can be used for offense and defense.

In Muay Thai, we focus on a long range jab. This is the technique we will cover today.

Now, the Muay Thai jab, in itself, is a very simple, but effective weapon. The motion itself is literally straightforward. Take a look at the video clip of me demonstrating the jab.

The fist travels in a linear fashion from my temple to a fully extended position and return It to the start position. There are some other subtleties, but that is it really.

The difference between the basic jab and the Muay Thai jab is the slight extension at the shoulder. This extension allows the jab to travel farther than the normal length of my arm.

The Muay Thai jab can be quite deceptive and I often catch people off guard in sparring and it has helped in some of my fights.

In a Pro boxing match, you will often hear the commentator mention that the boxer with the better jab will end up winning the fight. And it is usually true. But, let’s get back on topic

Another reason this jab is utilized by Muay Thai practitioners is that keeps heavy punchers at bay, so to speak.

Let’s say I am fighting a person that throws big punches in “bunches”. I can utilize one or two quick jabs to create distance or snap their head back and throw off their rhythm.

The Muay Thai jab also allows you to keep enough distance between you and your opponent to throw those heavy kicks that are so effective in Muay Thai.

In Muay Thai fights, big kicks mean big points on the scorecards. Plus, no one likes getting kicked. Lol.

That is all I have for now on the Muay Thai Jab. If you are interested in learning more about my programs, please check out my Website.

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That’s it for now. Remember to keep fighting for what you believe in.

” CONOR Mcgregor I’M NOT RETIRED ‘PAID TO FIGHT, NOT PROMOTE

Conor McGregor RETIRED??!!  Oh, wait no he isn’t…

So, apparently Conor McGregor tweeted a vague and cryptic message about early retirement. Then, he posted a message on Facebook airing his true feelings. Below is an exerpt from his post..

“I have become lost in the game of promotion and forgot about the art of fighting.”

“Talking to some lady that deep down doesn’t give a f**k about what I’m doing, but just wants some sound bites so she can maybe get her little tight ass a nice raise, and I’m cool with that too, I’ve been giving you all raises. But I need to focus on me now.”

Conor’s full quote is on his facebook page: https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1260441947357435&id=494191297315841&ref=bookmarks

Honestly, I have more respect for Conor since reading his post. I think if you are paid to fight, you should have time to train. It seems fairly reminiscent of Ronda Rhousey’s downfall.

What are your thoughts on the UFC putting pressure on fighters doing  promotions rather than actually train for their fights?

How did Rob Font make it to the UFC?

Tonight Sityodtong’s own Rob Font fights for the second time in his UFC career at UFC Fight Night 81 on FIGHTPASS.

Rob ended his first fight with a definitive KO in the first round against George Roop.

Rob is a good friend and former teammate of FightingIsEasy founder, John Cumper and we would often train together. During training , Rob would always give his all and constantly switch up his style, which made for some interesting sparring sessions.

When I met Rob, that is when he started training at Sityodtong, he already had a solid background in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. He would often help me as I struggled along as a white belt, but we will save that for another blog. Anyway, let’s get back on topic.

As we trained together, I saw 3 traits in Rob that would propel him quickly to the top of the MMA scene in the Northeast and eventually to the UFC. Besides skill and great cardio, which is a must have for a fighter, these are the traits I observed:

1. A great attitude towards training.
2. A never give up mentality. (Gets in early…Stays late)
3. Respect for his coaches and teammates. (Listens to his coaches)

These are traits I believe will propel any athlete to the top of their game and he possessed the three in spades.

It has been at least a year since I’ve seen Rob train and I am looking forward to how he has progressed tonight.

Rob, remember when you step into that cage tonight that Life is Hard. FightingIsEasy. is still holding you down in the NYC!

MMA: Fighting or Stalling

I was digging through and found a blog I wrote back in in 2011 about the controversial topic of stalling in MMA. Keep in my I was an active Muay Thai and MMA fighter when I wrote this. I am a coach now, but my views have not changed dramatically. I hope you enjoy…

Is MMA still a fighting spirt , sometimes I wonder..,
Now, I have attended and watched a number of Amateur and Professional MMA events throughout the years. Some of these fights, I must say, have disappointed me as a fighter and a paying customer. If I am paying at least $$$ to see some fights, then I want to see the fighters do one thing: FIGHT!

I am fairly certain that other spectators want to see the same thing as well. Who would want to see two punches thrown in the ring in order to one combatant pressing the other against the cage for the majority . Or even worse- a fighter takes the other guy down and does nothing while in the dominant position. He lays on the other guy for 3 rounds and pulls out a decision win.

Typically after a less than stellar performance, you would hear the crowd ‘booing’ and obnoxious chanting to express their thoughts about that fight.. I cannot blame them for acting this way. They paid good money to see fighters put their skills that they have worked on to the test. I have to say seeing this, which I call “stall tactics” pisses me off as a fighter and I am sure it pisses off the fighter that loses.

As a Muay Thai practitioner, I appreciate and love watching a great stand-up match where the two guys slug it out. It may appear as if I am downplaying other sports or martial arts such as wrestling or even BJJ (a discipline I have grown to love). A fighter will stick to his strengths. A wrestler will do what he knows best in a fight, that is he will wrestle.

I am not knocking that at all. I just hate seeing fighters work so hard in their training just be taken down or press the guy into the cage and be complacent with just staying there. Or a Jiu-jitsu practitioner, who may fight well off his back, be complacent with pulling guard and controlling the other fighter. As a fighter, I always want to advance to the dominant position and from there look to finish the fight! There is too much at stake if you do not finish a fight that presented many opporuntiies to win.

The fault does not always lie with the fighter. The referees have a hand in this too. It appears at times that some of these referees are inexperienced because they do not know when to stand fighters up or break them apart. This is done in the boxing or kickboxing world. So how come it is not done in these local MMA events?

Stalemates happen in a fight. However, a fighter shouldn’t work towards a stalemate. The fighter should work to advance. Even though a fighter may have a phenomonel record, they may not progress because promoters lose money on boring fights. Sometimes a stalemate occurs because of their training style. If the fighter is not versatilewith their training, then they will use only one method to win. That fighter will continue to use that method, regardless of its effectiveness, because it’s all that they know.

But then again, stall tactics are often used in the UFC by high level fighters. So, how can we not expect to see it occur so often in the MMA scene?

What are your thoughts on the subject?